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Porcine-murine heterohybridomas as stabb fusion partners for the production of porcine IgA

  • Q-e Yang
  • S Tonkonogy
  • M Hollingshead
  • T Kuhara
  • C Hammerberg
  • E. V De Buysscher
Chapter

Abstract

The immunoprophylaxis of neonates against intestinal pathogens remains a challenge. The approach is generally based on the entero-mammary linkage of the gestationing animal. However, a clear correlation between the virulence of the pathogen and IgA inducing capability exists. Therefore, our investigation aimed at the possibility of inducing mucosal immunity via the anti-idiotype pathway. Recent advances in human MAB production (for review Teng, N.N. 1985) and IgA producing hybridomas (Colwell, D., 1986, Dean, C., 1986) made research on this concept in a veterinary species feasible. PM-1 is a stable, non-Ig producing murine-porcine heteromyeloma capable of high fusion rates and stable porcine MAB production upon fusion with porcine lymphocytes of various sources (triple heterohybrids). PM-1 was obtained by intensive subcloning, in selective medium, of hybridomas resulting from the fusion of the murine myeloma P3x63-Ag8.653 and the porcine lymphoblastoid cell line P-16. Fusions of PM-1 with PBL, MNL, TDL and SL resulted fusion rates of 20–100% (hybridomas/wells inoculated). A total of 359 hybridomas were monoclonal Ig-producers. The majority of those analysed produced the IgM isotype. Only one heteorhybrid, YF 42-1, resulting from a PM-1 x PBL fusion was identified as producing dimeric IgA. Fusion with TDL, obtained from pigs after surgical removal of the mesenteric lymph nodes, resulted in 16 IgM and 2 IgG producing hybridomas. No IgA producing hybridomas were obtained from PM-1 x TDL fusions.

Keywords

Mesenteric Lymph Node Fusion Rate Intestinal Lymph High Fusion Rate Double Minute Chromosome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Q-e Yang
    • 1
  • S Tonkonogy
    • 1
  • M Hollingshead
    • 1
  • T Kuhara
    • 1
  • C Hammerberg
    • 1
  • E. V De Buysscher
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Veterinary MedicineNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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