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5-Hydroxytryptamine and migraine

  • Pramod R. Saxena
Chapter
Part of the Developments in CardioCardiovascular Pharmacology of 5-Hydroxytryptamine book series (DICM, volume 106)

Abstract

Migraine is regarded as an episodic syndrome characterised by usually unilateral headache, nausea, vomiting and photophobia, sometimes preceded by certain premonitory aura symptoms. Despite a large number of investigations over the years, the multifactorial pathogenesis of migraine still remains ill understood. However, amongst a host of biogenic substances implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine, none seems to have a better claim than 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) [1–6].

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1990

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  • Pramod R. Saxena

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