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Teaching Mathematics with Technology at the Kindergarten Level: Resources and Orchestrations

  • Ghislaine GueudetEmail author
  • Laetitia Bueno-Ravel
  • Caroline Poisard
Chapter
Part of the Mathematics Education in the Digital Era book series (MEDE, volume 2)

Abstract

In this chapter we study the use of software in mathematics by French kindergarten teachers who are working with 5 and 6-year-old children. We retain the theoretical perspective of the documentational approach, considering that teachers interact with a variety of resources, including technology. These interactions lead to the development, by the teachers, of documents, associating resources and professional knowledge. We focus here on the way teachers organise the available resources, for a given mathematical objective: the orchestrations they choose. Following in particular three teachers, we identify different types of orchestrations, evidencing teacher agency, and a specific attention to individual children's differences. Teacher knowledge of different kinds (pedagogical knowledge, knowledge about curriculum material, knowledge about the teaching of numbers at kindergarten) intervenes in the choice of orchestration.

Keywords

Abacus Documentational approach Genesis Kindergarten Orchestration Resources 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We warmly thank for their contribution all the members of the ‘mathematical package’ project. We especially thank Typhaine Le Méhauté and Michel Guillemeau for their support in the design of the Passenger Train software.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ghislaine Gueudet
    • 1
    Email author
  • Laetitia Bueno-Ravel
    • 1
  • Caroline Poisard
    • 2
  1. 1.CREAD, University of Brest, IUFM Bretagne, site de RennesRENNESFrance
  2. 2.CREAD, University of Brest, IUFM Bretagne, site de QuimperQUIMPER cedexFrance

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