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Flows of Faith pp 201-214 | Cite as

Straightening the Path from the Ends of the Earth: The Deep Sea Canoe Movement in Solomon Islands

  • Jaap Timmer
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the transnational ties of a Christian evangelical religious movement called Deep Sea Canoe that is popular among Melanesian To’aibata speakers on the Island of Malaita, Solomon Islands. Solomon Islands is a Melanesian and pervasively Christian country in the Southwest Pacific that has a dynamic history of missionisation since the mid-nineteenth century and has seen the subsequent evolvement of a variety of ethno-religious movements. The example in this article illustrates a tendency of embracing modernity and the wider world through terms that are specific to To’abaita culture: pathmaking and straightening. By examining the present-day role of these terms in the ethno-theology of the Deep Sea Canoe Movement I will show that the urgency of millennial Christianity inclines To’abaitans to actively seek a straight path to Jerusalem instead of becoming recessive agents as documented for other Melanesian groups.

Keywords

Christian evangelical religious movement Deep Sea Canoe Melanesian To’aibata speakers Solomon Islands Jerusalem 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia

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