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Population Dynamics of Demersal Fish Focusing on Walleye Pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus)

  • Tetsuichiro Funamoto
Chapter
Part of the Fisheries Science Series book series (FISHSS)

Abstract

Demersal fishes constitute a high trophic level in marine ecosystems. They have relatively long lifespans, and because their biomass does not easily recover after collapse, they are considered more vulnerable to overfishing than pelagic fishes. Like pelagic fishes, the population dynamics of demersal fishes are closely linked to environmental changes. Therefore, their stock management must consider their biological characteristics in relation to environmental factors. This chapter reviews the relationships of demersal fish recruitment with various environmental factors, focusing on walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) as an example of an important demersal fish resource. In addition, the incorporation of recruitment studies with stock assessment works is discussed. Finally, recommendations for future fisheries management strategies based on interdisciplinary research are also provided.

Keyword

Demersal fish Integrated management Population dynamics Recruitment mechanism Recruitment model Stock assessment Walleye pollock 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan KK and the Japanese Society of Fisheries Science 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hokkaido National Fisheries Research InstituteJapan Fisheries Research and Education AgencyKushiroJapan

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