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Aortic Arch Surgery Under Warm Conditions (Moderate to Mild Hypothermia)

  • Ali El-Sayed Ahmad
  • Razan Salem
  • Andreas ZiererEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Since the beginnings of cardiovascular surgery, aortic arch surgery has been the most challenging aspiration. Not only requiring the finest surgical skills but also demanding sound knowledge in neurophysiology since adequate cerebral and visceral protection is essential for achieving a successful outcome.

Interestingly, the absolute necessity of deep hypothermia during aortic arch surgery has been queried due to the severe advantages of warmer systemic temperature during the systemic circulatory arrest. Therefore, more and more centers worldwide changed their paradigm by being warmer till reaching a mild hypothermia at systemic circulatory arrest and using selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) during aortic surgery.

Keywords

Cerebral blood flow Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest Autoregulation Neurological dysfunction Perfusate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ali El-Sayed Ahmad
    • 1
  • Razan Salem
    • 1
  • Andreas Zierer
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular SurgeryKepler University Hospital, Johannes Kepler University LinzLinzAustria

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