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Anatomical Points of View on the Alleged Morphological Basis of Consciousness

  • A. Brodal
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Abstract

Taking for granted, as I think is permissible, that in the living world structure and function are closely interrelated and interdependent, and assuming further that our mental processes are in some way, although not yet understood, related to the function of the nervous system, it is indeed appropriate that a symposium on the physiopathology of the states of consciousness includes some reference to brain structure.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Brodal
    • 1
  1. 1.Anatomical InstituteUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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