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Somatosensory Evoked Potential Monitoring During Cervical Spine Surgery

  • A. Landi
  • A. Ducati
  • M. Cenzato
  • E. Fava
  • D. Arvanitakis
  • D. Mulazzi
Chapter

Abstract

Cervical spine surgery poses risks of damage to the spinal cord and nerve roots5. Furthermore, either the arterial blood supply (anterior spinal artery and posterior radicular arteries) or the venous drainage (peridural plexus) may be damaged or stretched during surgical manipulation, producing an ischemic spinal cord injury. Therefore, it seems of interest to monitor spinal cord or nerve root function intraoperatively. Evoked potentials can detect spinal cord damage due to compression or ischemial. Several authors have used somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) for monitoring during spinal surgery2, 3, 4, 6, 7.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Landi
    • 1
  • A. Ducati
    • 1
  • M. Cenzato
    • 1
  • E. Fava
    • 2
  • D. Arvanitakis
    • 1
  • D. Mulazzi
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of NeurosurgeryUniversity of MilanoItaly
  2. 2.CNR Institute of Muscle Physiology, c/o Institute of NeurosurgeryUniversity of MilanoItaly
  3. 3.II Chair of AnesthesiologyUniversity of MilanoItaly

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