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Normal and Pathologic Factors Affecting Sensory Tract Potentials in the Human Spinal Cord During Surgery

  • S. J. Jones
Chapter

Abstract

Many studies have described the morphology and properties of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) generated in the peripheral nerves, spinal cord and cerebral hemispheres in man, and a variety of techniques are now employed for monitoring the sensory pathways during surgery. The following is a survey of the major factors, technical, physiologic and pathologic, which influence afferent fiber tract potentials originating in the spinal cord. A better understanding of these will assist us in choosing appropriate recording parameters for specific applications, will help us comprehend the significance of deteriorating and abnormal records, and may provide us with insights into the physiological conduction characteristics of the normal human spinal cord.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Research CouncilNational Hospital for Nervous DiseasesLondonEngland

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