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Intraoperative Monitoring of Cortical and Spinal Evoked Potentials Using Different Stimulation Sites

  • E. Watanabe
  • J. Schramm
  • J. Romstöck
Chapter

Abstract

In spinal cord monitoring spinal and cortical recording techniques may be used1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. In addition different stimulation sites have also been used: peripheral nerves, cauda equina or the dorsal surface of the spinal core8, 9, 11, 12. Whether cortical or spinal recordings are superior is not yet settled. It is also unknown whether the use of invasive stimulation sites, i.e. the cauda equina, will give more reliable and thus more useful recordings than peripheral nerve stimulation. Therefore, in our current series of spinal cord monitoring during operations on space occupying lesions we compared different stimulation sites as often as possible.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Watanabe
    • 1
  • J. Schramm
    • 1
  • J. Romstöck
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Erlangen-NürnbergDeutschland

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