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Evaluation of Traumatic Coma by Means of Multimodality Evoked Potentials

  • M. Cenzato
  • A. Ducati
  • E. Fava
  • A. Landi
  • E. Sganzerla
  • P. Baratta
  • G. Signoroni
Chapter

Abstract

Evoked potentials (EPs) have been used in the last several years by many authors2, 4, 5, 8 to study comatose patients. The advantage of this technique lies in the fact that it allows an objective evaluation of neurological function in unconscious, uncooperative patients, who may be even more inaccessible to clinical assessment because of muscle relaxants or barbiturate therapy. Furthermore, this method offers the possibility of predicting outcome in comatose patients. These advantages are relevant to the treatment of patients in intensive care and rehabilitative units. Identification of the typical neurophysiological pattern of brain death is another application of this technique.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Cenzato
    • 1
  • A. Ducati
    • 1
  • E. Fava
    • 2
  • A. Landi
    • 1
  • E. Sganzerla
    • 1
  • P. Baratta
    • 3
  • G. Signoroni
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of NeurosurgeryUniversity of MilanoItaly
  2. 2.CNR Institute of Muscle PhysiologyUniversity of MilanoItaly
  3. 3.II Chair of AnesthesiologyUniversity of MilanoItaly

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