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SEP and EEG Monitoring During Carotid Surgery

  • E. Fava
  • A. Ducati
  • E. Bortolani
  • M. Cenzato
  • A. Landi
  • D. Ghilardi
  • R. Trazzi
Chapter

Abstract

A great deal of arterial pathology responsible for ischemic alterations of the brain is amenable today to surgical treatment, particularly when it involves the extracranial carotid arteries. Perioperative neurologic complications still range from 1 to l0%1, resulting from a variety of causes: impaired cerebral perfusion during carotid occlusion, distal embolization of atheromatous fragments, carotid artery thrombosis, and reperfusion injury2. Several methods have been developed by anesthesiologists and surgeons focusing on the early detection of reduced cerebral function during the carotid surgery and prevention of permanent brain injury.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Fava
    • 1
  • A. Ducati
    • 2
  • E. Bortolani
    • 3
  • M. Cenzato
    • 2
  • A. Landi
    • 2
  • D. Ghilardi
    • 4
  • R. Trazzi
    • 4
  1. 1.CNR Institute of Muscle Physiology c/oUniversity of MilanoItaly
  2. 2.Institute of NeurosurgeryUniversity of MilanoItaly
  3. 3.Institute of General and Cardiovascular SurgeryUniversity of MilanoItaly
  4. 4.II Chair of AnesthesiologyUniversity of MilanoItaly

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