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Design for a Law of Space

  • Jean Rivoire
Conference paper

Abstract

The government of the United States encountered no objection when, in 1955, it announced its intention of launching artificial satellites of the earth as a contribution to the International Geophysical Year. Later, the Soviet Union announced a similar plan without evoking any reaction either. Public opinion at that time regarded these projects with scepticism, if not with indifference.

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References

  1. 1.
    G. Zarorozhnyi, The Artificial Satellite and International Law. Sovietskaya Rossiya, Oct. 17, 1957, p. 3.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    See especially: A G Haley, Space Law—The Development of Jurisdictional Concepts. Proceedings of the VIIIth International Astronautical Congress, Barcelona 1957, p. 170. Wien: Springer-Verlag, 1958.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    P. Auger, in “Occident”, Paris, August 1958.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    E. Pépin, Space Penetration. Speech before the American Society of International Law, April 1958.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. C. Cooper, Legal Problems of Upper Space. Speech before the American Society of International Law, April 1956. Proc. Amer. Soc. Internat. Law 50, 91 (1956).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    O. Schachter, Who Owns the Universe? In: Across the Space Frontier, edited by C. Ryan, p. 118. New York: The Viking Press, 1952.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1959

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Rivoire
    • 1
  1. 1.ParisFrance

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