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Pharmacological and Therapeutic Actions of GABA Receptor Agonists

  • B. Zivkovic
  • B. Scatton
  • P. Worms
  • K. G. Lloyd
  • G. Bartholini
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 18)

Summary

GABA receptor agonists, e.g. progabide, modify the activity of several brain neuronal systems which are implicated in the pathogenesis of some neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, alterations in noradrenergic and serotoninergic transmissions induced by progabide may be a mechanism involved in the antidepressant action of this drug in the clinic. The antagonism of the neuroleptic-induced increase in dopamine receptor sensitivity and the decrease in dopamine synthesis and release may be responsible for the effectiveness of the GABA receptor agonists in the treatment of neuroleptic- and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. This action of GABA receptor agonists also suggests their therapeutic potential in mania. Finally, decrease in cellular excitability induced by GABA receptor agonists, e.g. progabide, accounts for their efficacy in epilepsy.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Zivkovic
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Scatton
    • 2
  • P. Worms
    • 2
  • K. G. Lloyd
    • 2
  • G. Bartholini
    • 2
  1. 1.BagneuxFrance
  2. 2.Research DepartmentSynthélabo-L.E.R.SParisFrance

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