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Peptidases Involved in the Inactivation of Exogenous and Endogenous Enkephalins

  • J. C. Schwartz
  • Sophie de la Baume
  • C. C. Yi
  • P. Chaillet
  • Hélène Marcais-Collado
  • J. Costentin
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 18)

Summary

Among the various cerebral enzyme activities able to hydrolyse the enkephalins into inactive fragments only two seem responsible for the metabolism of the endogenous opioid peptides: a dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase (“enkephalinase”), and a bestatin-sensitive aminopeptidase. Their inhibition by thiorphan and bestatin results in an antinociceptive effect observed in tests in which the nociceptive stimulation is probably accompanied by a concomittent release of enkephalins.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Schwartz
    • 3
  • Sophie de la Baume
    • 1
  • C. C. Yi
    • 1
  • P. Chaillet
    • 2
  • Hélène Marcais-Collado
    • 2
  • J. Costentin
    • 2
  1. 1.Unité de Neurobiologie (U 109)Centre Paul Broca de l’I.N.S.E.R.M.ParisFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Pharmacodynamie et de PhysiologieU.E.R. de Médecine et de PharmacieSaint Etienne du RouvrayFrance
  3. 3.Unité de Neurobiologie (U 109)Centre Paul Broca de l’I.N.S.E.R.M.ParisFrance

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