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Effects of circadian rhythm, sleep deprivation, and fatigue on watchkeeping performance during the night hours

  • W. P. Colquhoun
  • P. Hamilton
  • R. S. Edwards
Chapter
Part of the Forschungsberichte Des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen book series (FOLANW)

Abstract

Several studies have been made of the various rapidly rotating watchkeeping systems with 4-hour duty-spells typically followed by naval personnel (Kleitman & Jackson, 19 50; Colquhoun, Blake & Edwards, 1968; Rutenfranz, Aschoff & Mann, 1972). Recent observations on personnel employed on monitoring tasks who were following one of these rotating systems on an extended voyage, revealed that, when their next scheduled watch was from 0400 to 0800, they preferred to stay awake beforehand, “making-up” their lost sleep when they were off duty the following afternoon. The first aim of the present experiment was to assess the effects of staying awake in this way on performance on a monitoring task carried out continuously through the 0400 – 0800 watch.

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References

  1. Colquhoun, W.P., Blake, M.J.F. and Edwards, R.S. Experimental studies of shift-work I: A comparison of ‘rotating’ and ‘stabilized’ 4-hour shift systems. Ergonomics 11, 437–453 (1968)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Kleitman, N. and Jackson, D.P. Body temperature and performance under different routines. J. Appl. Physiol. 3, 309–328 (1950)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Rutenfranz, J., Aschoff, J. and Mann, H. The effects of cumulative sleep deficit, duration of preceding sleep period and body-temperature on multiple choice reaction time. In: W.P. Colquhoun (Ed.): Aspects of human efficiency. Diurnal rhythm and loss of sleep, pp. 217–228 The English Universities Press Ltd., London 1972Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. P. Colquhoun
  • P. Hamilton
  • R. S. Edwards

There are no affiliations available

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