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The profile drag of biconvex wing sections at supersonic speeds

  • A. D. Young
  • S. Kirkby

Summary

The method detailed in a previous paper1 for calculating the profile drag of a wing section at supersonic speeds has been applied to a flat plate and two biconvex wing sections of thickness chord ratio 0.05 and 0.10 with zero heat transfer. Ranges of Mach number from 1.5 to 5.0, Reynolds number from 106 to 108 and transition position from the leading edge to the trailing edge have been covered, and the results are here presented in tabular and graphical form. It is found that with increase in Mach number, increase in thickness chord ratio and decrease in Reynolds number the effect of rearward movement of transition on skin friction and profile drag progressively decreases. The reasons for this are briefly discussed.

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References

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    Young: The Calculation of the Profile Drag of Aerofoils and Bodies of Revolution at Supersonic Speeds. College of Aeronautics Report No. 73 (Apr. 1953).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 1955

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Young
    • 1
  • S. Kirkby
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AerodynamicsCollege of AeronauticsCranfieldUK

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