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The Removal of Zinc, Cadmium, Lead, and Copper in the Changjiang Estuary

  • Zhiliang ShenEmail author
  • Mingxing Liu
Chapter
Part of the Springer Earth System Sciences book series (SPRINGEREARTH)

Abstract

The main removal region of ion and particulate forms of zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), plumbum (Pb), and copper (Cu) was in the waters of salinity 10–23 in the Changjiang estuary. The positive correlationships between heavy metals and the reciprocal of transparency, chemical oxygen demand, and chlorophyll-a showed that the removals of Zn, Cd, Pb, and Cu closely correlate with the distribution of suspensions, the adsorptions of organic materials, and the assimilation by organisms, suggesting that the latter two are main mechanisms of heavy metals removal in the estuary. The main area of heavy metals removal in the estuary was located in the high sedimentary rate area, and sediments mainly consisted of silty clay and clayey silt. The high heavy metals content area in surface sediment was consistent with the distribution trend of heavy metals contents in the water body.

Keywords

Heavy metal Removal Changjiang estuary 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environmental SciencesInstitute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of SciencesQingdaoChina
  2. 2.Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of SciencesQingdaoChina

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