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A Technology Review and Cost Analysis of the Production of Low Carbon Methanol and Following Methanol to Gasoline Process

  • Christian Bergins
  • Torsten BuddenbergEmail author
  • Efthymia-Ioanna Koytsoumpa
  • Maria João Duarte
  • Emmanouil Kakaras
  • Stephan Schmidt
  • Alexander Deierling
Chapter
Part of the ATZ/MTZ-Fachbuch book series (ATZMTZ)

Abstract

The increasing feed-in of electricity from fluctuating renewable energy sources (RES) can lead to sporadic excess supply of electricity to the grid and subsequently curtailment of RES plants and of existing thermal power plants. Industry has developed several technologies for energy storage at MWh scale over short time-periods of hours. Energy storage, which takes advantage of resources from both the energy sector and industry, coupled with the production of fuels for transport, offers a unique chance to integrate more renewables in the electricity grid and enable sustainable, rapid decarbonisation of mobility. Fuels like methanol, gasoline, diesel or kerosene derived from hydrogen – produced from RES via water electrolysis – and CO2 – captured from industrial processes – have a lower CO2 footprint and do not compete with food production, unlike bioethanol or biodiesel. This technology offers a new business model to utilities, which today are restricted to heat and electricity production and play no role in the green fuel market. The paper is based on publications [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] as well as the references named in the publications and presents case studies on carbon intensity, efficiency, and economy of CO2 derived fuels that can be produced by existing technology. Furthermore, it describes a new business model for energy producers and energy intensive industries in co-operation with (petro)chemical industry. It is also shown that this approach will help to overcome issues with competition between the biofuel sector and food production. This new business model allows traditional power producers to diversify, in order to attract sufficient revenues in future markets with high RES penetration.

References

  1. 1.
    Bergins C, Tran K-C, Buddenberg T, Stefansson B, Koytsoumpa E-I, Duarte M-J (2019) Power to fuel as a sustainable business model for cross-sectoral energy storage in industry and power plants. In: Power-GEN Europe 2016, Milan, 21–23 June 2019Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Buddenberg T, Bergins C, Schmidt S, Fell H-J (2017) Production of fuels from hydropower and carbon dioxide from organic waste in Norway. In: 4th international engine congress, Baden-BadenGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Buddenberg T, Bergins C, Harp G (2016) Production from methanol from steel industry process gases. Stahl und Eisen 136(9):61–66Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Buddenberg T, Bergins C, Tran K-C, Maus W (2016) Development of large scale low carbon methanol and further gasoline or oxy-methylene ether (OME) production for transport in Europe. In: 3rd international engine congress, Baden-Baden, Germany, 23–24 February 2016Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Schmidt S, Kuschel M, Engelmann J, Buddenberg T (2017) Industry application of low carbon gasoline technology. In: 11th international colloquium fuels, Stuttgart/Ostfildern, Germany, 27–29 June 2017Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Brander M, Sood A, Wylie C, Haughton A, Lovell J (2011) Technical paper: electricity-specific emission factors for grid electricity. Ecometrica. Emissionfactors.com

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Bergins
    • 1
  • Torsten Buddenberg
    • 1
    Email author
  • Efthymia-Ioanna Koytsoumpa
    • 1
  • Maria João Duarte
    • 1
  • Emmanouil Kakaras
    • 1
  • Stephan Schmidt
    • 2
  • Alexander Deierling
    • 1
  1. 1.Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Europe GmbHDuisburgGermany
  2. 2.Chemieanlagenbau Chemnitz GmbHChemnitzGermany

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