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Museum Pests–Cultural Heritage Pests

  • Pasquale Trematerra
  • David Pinniger
Chapter

Abstract

Many types of artefacts are vulnerable to deterioration from biological, physical and chemical sources. Artefacts that consist of organic materials, such as fur, hides, linen, plant material, wood, wool, etc., can be infested by a range of insects. Most heritage areas have collections which are at risk, including archaeology, prints and drawings, contemporary art installations, folk art, fine arts, ethnography, books and archives, industrial and technical heritage and natural sciences.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Food SciencesUniversity of MoliseCampobassoItaly
  2. 2.DBP EntomologyBerksUK

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