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Differential Mode of Justice

  • Xudong Zhao
Chapter
Part of the China Academic Library book series (CHINALIBR)

Abstract

In the discussion above, I have divided the authority to solve disputes in rural community into four types. Among the four types, there are the authority of village administration and the authority of court, which are both in the category of institutionalized authority. The other two types are civil authority and the authority of village folk temple, which fall under the dimension of non-institutionalized authority. Disputes in the rural community are usually resolved by one or several of these authorities.

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© Foreign Language Teaching and Research Publishing Co., Ltd and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xudong Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.Renmin University of ChinaBeijingChina

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