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COPD pp 169-177 | Cite as

Genetics of COPD

  • Woo Jin KimEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

Although environmental factors, including cigarette smoking and biomass smoke exposure, are major risk factors of COPD, genetic risk factors are also important [1]. In addition, an interaction between genetics and environment is believed to drive the development of COPD.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine and Environmental Health CenterKangwon National UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea

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