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A Review of Recent Studies on Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV) Emphasizing Virus-Cell-Host Interactions

  • Herbert J. Spencer
  • Vincent Groupé
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 38)

Abstract

In attempting to review recent research dealing with Rous sarcoma, it is interesting to note the quantity and diversity of investigations reported within the past six years following several decades of relative inactivity in this important area. It is obvious that in order to be of value, this review must be limited to but a few areas of a broad spectrum. Setting such limits is difficult. Selection of topics must be both subjective and arbitrary, and done with the full realization that literature of interest and importance will be omitted altogether. We admittedly have also been influenced by our own research interests, and by our reluctance to stray from areas of our own personal experience. It is the intent of this review to evaluate and integrate recent findings concerning interactions between Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and its host, both as cell and as organism. This subject will be approached from the following five viewpoints: a) Morphological and viral aspects of tumor pathogenesis, b) The relative roles of the tumor cell and the virus in tumor induction, c) Factors of host resistance to infection with RSV, d) The effects of humoral antibody upon infection and the subsequent development of malignant disease, and e) Experimental chemotherapy of virus-induced Rous sarcoma. No attempt will be made to review numerous studies concerned with the kinetics and characteristics of RSV infection in vitro (8),(35), (38), (39),(65), (74), (84–87),(104–107), (112), the studies on adaptation of the virus to growth in mammalian species (55),(64), (91), (101–103), or the electron microscopic studies on ultrastructural aspects of RSV infection (30), (46–49), that have been recently reviewed by other investigators.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herbert J. Spencer
    • 1
  • Vincent Groupé
    • 2
  1. 1.Medical Research LaboratoriesThe Mary Imogene Bassett HospitalCooperstownUSA
  2. 2.Institute of MicrobiologyRutgers, the State UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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