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Grundzüge der Virusätiologie von Tumoren nach neueren Ergebnissen

  • Klaus Munk
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 38)

Zusammenfassung

Die Virusätiologie von Tumoren und Leukämien bei verschiedenen Säugetier- und Vogelarten ist heute gesichert. Daher mag die Vermutung einer Virusätiologie solcher Erkrankungen auch beim Menschen sehr nahe liegen, sie konnte aber bisher noch nicht bestätigt werden.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus Munk
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für VirusforschungHeidelbergDeutschland

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