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Oxygen-stable hemolysins of β-hemolytic streptococci

  • Isaac Ginsburg
  • T. N. Harris
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 38)

Abstract

Since the discovery by Marmorek (42) that filtrates of streptococcal cultures possessed hemolytic activity, much work has been done on the hemolysins produced by streptococci. Todd (77) was the first to demonstrate that streptococciisolated from human sources produce two distinct hemolysins, which he named oxygenlabile streptolysin O (SLO) and oxygen-stable streptolysin S (SLS). SLO could be found in supernates of cultures in ordinary or defined medium (13), (15), (59), (77) and was found to be antigenic, whereas SLS was produced only in media containing serum and was apparently not antigenic (4), (77), (80).

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isaac Ginsburg
  • T. N. Harris

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