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Tric viruses: Agents of trachoma and inclusion conjunctivitis

  • Ernest Jawetz
  • Phillips Thygeson
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 38)

Abstract

Good clinical descriptions of trachoma have been available for at least 3500 years, since the Ebers papyrus mentions the exudative and cicatricial features of this eye disease and its treatment with copper salts (Tnvoeson 1962). It is probable that the clinical picture of trachoma as it occurs in the Mediterranean basin and in the Orient has changed little over the centuries. It is believed by the World Health Organization (1952) that today 400 million persons are afflicted with trachoma and that 20 million of them are totally or economically blind.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernest Jawetz
    • 1
  • Phillips Thygeson
  1. 1.San Francisco Medical CenterUniversity of CaliforniaSan Francisco 22USA

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