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Recent advances in measles virology

  • Seiji Arakawa
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 38)

Abstract

Experimental work on Measles dates from 1911, when Anderson and Goldberger succeeded in transmitting the disease from man to the macaque monkey. Progress, however, was initially hampered by difficulty encountered in transmitting the illness to experimental animals other than mice. But since the successful isolation of the measles virus in human or monkey kidney cells by Enders and Peebles (1954), very promising advances in this field of research have been made by many workers.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seiji Arakawa

There are no affiliations available

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