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On the Mechanism Underlying Initiation of Influenza Virus Infection

  • Alfred Gottschalk
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 32)

Abstract

In a delightful essay Lwoff (1957), scrutinizing the various types of infection, concludes “that the essence of infection is not the disease, but the introduction into an organism of a foreign entity able to multiply, to produce a disease and to reproduce infectious entities.” In the case of infection by viruses the foreign entity entering the host cell is essentially the genetic material of the virus, i.e. nucleic acid, either naked or very nearly so as with bacteriophages, or bound to protein as with tobacco mosaic virus and polio virus, or associated with protein and surrounded by a coat of mucoprotein and lipid as with fowl plague and influenza viruses.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1959

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfred Gottschalk
    • 1
  1. 1.The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical ResearchMelbourneAustralia

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