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Use of Social Science Knowledge and Data in Public Policy Making: The Deliberations on the Compensatory Educational Policy by U.S. Congress

  • Vijai P. Singh
Conference paper
Part of the Institut für Höhere Studien — Institute for Advanced Studies IHS-Studies book series (INHSIAS)

Abstract

Many public policies are designed to facilitate the effective participation of neglected and disadvantaged groups in the major institutions of society and to promote a better quality of life for all. Generally, there is a consensus about the major problems facing society, but governmental initiative for corrective actions varies with political climate, resources and technological capabilities. Policy makers do not always have access to relevant information and when they do, it is not necessary that they use it in their decision making. Many academic scholars seem to believe that policy makers at federal, state and local levels shun knowledge and facts and essentially seek narrowly conceived economic and political feasibilities. Policy makers, on the other hand, find that most academics are too narrow and theoretical and their research rarely contributes to actual problem-solving strategies in the world of action. These perceptions notwithstanding, policy makers seek knowledge and information to play their roles effectively and policy researchers want to see some impact of their research efforts in policy decisions.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vijai P. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Social and Urban ResearchUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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