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Measurements of viscoelasticity of polymer films and fabrics by the vibrating-reed method at very low frequencies

  • Shigeharu Onogi
  • T. Kondo
  • Yoshishige Tabata
Chapter

Abstract

The vibrating-reed method is one of the simplest methods for measuring the elasticity or viscoelasticity of solid materials; it has been applied to various kinds of materials including fibers, films, papers, and fabrics (1–13). This method is usually used in the audiofrequency range, but in many cases measurements at very low frequencies are desired. In making such measurements very long, and hence very heavy, sample reeds must be employed to obtain the resonance frequencies or resonance curves from which the viscoelastic functions, such as the storage and loss moduli, dynamic viscosity, and mechanical loss tangent can be evaluated.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeharu Onogi
    • 1
  • T. Kondo
    • 1
  • Yoshishige Tabata
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Polymer ChemistryKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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