Advertisement

Abstract

The mechanical properties of leather are encountered by members of the general public many times each day, although they are usually accepted without thought. The scientific study of these properties was, until recently, limited to investigations carried out by leather scientists and also by scientists concerned with the uses of leather, e.g. in footwear. Recently, however, the behaviour of leather and the structural reasons which permit that behaviour have become important to some polymer technologists, whose objective has been to make materials able to replace leather in some of its main uses. Unfortunately these latter researches are rarely published, although they would valuably supplement papers originating from leather sources.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Butlin, J., J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 47, 3 (1963).Google Scholar
  2. Chinn, S. J., Thesis The Two Dimensional Deformation of Upper Leather (University of Leeds 1967).Google Scholar
  3. Conabere, G. O. and R. H. Hall, J. Int. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 30, 214 (1946).Google Scholar
  4. Guy, R., J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 56, 246 (1972).Google Scholar
  5. Hearle, J. W. S., P. Grosberg and S. Backer, Structural Mechanics of Fibers, Yarns and Fabrics, Vol. 1 (New York 1969).Google Scholar
  6. Hole, L. G. and D. Popplewell, SATRA TM 1348 (Satra, Kettering (England) 1966).Google Scholar
  7. Holmes, C. M., Private communication (1968).Google Scholar
  8. Holmes, C. M. and A. G. Ward, J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 55, 242 (1971).Google Scholar
  9. Kanagy, J. R., J. Amer. Leather Chem. Assn. 47, 726 (1952).Google Scholar
  10. Maeser, M., J. Amer. Leather Chem. Assn. 55, 501 (1960).Google Scholar
  11. Maeser, M., The Chemistry and Technology of Leather, Vol. 4, pp. 310-332 (New York 1965). Ed. O’Flaherty, F., W. T. Roddy and R. M. hollar.Google Scholar
  12. Mann, C. W., J. Amer. Leather Chem. Assn. 46, 228(1951).Google Scholar
  13. Mitton, R. G., J. Int. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 29, 169 (1946).Google Scholar
  14. Morgan, F. R., J. Amer. Leather Chem. Assn. 55, 4 (1960).Google Scholar
  15. Popplewell, D. and A. G. Ward, J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 47, 502 (1963).Google Scholar
  16. Popplewell, D., Thesis Some Stress Relaxation and Set Properties of Full Chrome Side Leather (University of Leeds 1971).Google Scholar
  17. Procter, H. R., The Principles of Leather Manufacture, p. 7 (London 1903).Google Scholar
  18. Shestokova and Kalinina, Nauch. Tr. Mosk. Teknol. Inst. Legk. prom 1, 36, 109 (1969).Google Scholar
  19. Upstone, P. J., Thesis Subjective Assessment and Objective Measurement of the Physical Properties of Leather (University of Leeds 1969a).Google Scholar
  20. Upstone, P. J. and A. G. Ward, J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 53, 361 (1969b).Google Scholar
  21. Ward, A. G. and F. W. Brooks, J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 49, 312 (1965).Google Scholar
  22. Ward, A. G. and F. W Brooks, J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 51, 199 (1967a).Google Scholar
  23. Ward, A. G. and F. W. Brooks, J. Soc. Leather Trades’ Chem. 51, 211 (1967b).Google Scholar
  24. Ward, A.G. and S.J. Chim, J. Soc. Leather Trades’Chem. 55, 221 (1971).Google Scholar
  25. Wilson, J. A., The Chemistry of Leather Manufacture, pp. 1054-1086 (New York 1929).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.Procter Department of Food and Leather ScienceUniversity of LeedsEngland

Personalised recommendations