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High shear viscometry of concentrated solutions of poly (alkylmethacrylate) in a petroleum lubricating oil

  • A. F. Talbot
Chapter

Abstract

The addition of high molecular weight polymers to various types of petroleum lubricants and fluids has become accepted practice, justified by the improved performance of the fluid composition over a broader range of operating temperature. Increasingly, these polymer-modified oils are encountered in service, including automatic transmission fluids and multi-graded engine oils in automotive applications, multi-graded gear oils and hydraulic fluids. Despite the widespread use of these fluids, there have been published relatively few quantitative descriptions of their flow characteristics under the high shear conditions encountered in use.

Abbreviations

Nomenclature

η

Apparent viscosity at experimental conditions, centipoise

M]

Intrinsic viscosity via extrapolation of Martin equation, dl/g

\(\dot y\)

Shear rate, sec−1

τ

Stress level, dynes/cm2

Ê

Energy level at inflection point (\(\dot y\) τ), dynes/cm2 sec

Subscripts

0

Limiting low shear rate (1st Newtonian) condition

Limiting high shear rate (2nd Newtonian) condition

s

Refers to solvent

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. F. Talbot
    • 1
  1. 1.Sun Research and Development CompanyMarcus HookUSA

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