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Abstract

Cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases of widely varying incidence and natural course. Taken as a whole, cancer constitutes the second most common cause of death in at least two continents, being second only to deaths due to cardiovascular and renal disease. Like other biologic processes, the pattern of cancer varies from decade to decade. For example, in the United States of America the reported death rates from cancer of the stomach and cancer of the uterus have each decreased about 50% during the last 25 years, while that from cancer of the lung has increased several fold. The fight against cancer must therefore be organized in the light of the varying pattern of the disease, as well as in the light of the many other factors requiring the attention of health and allied workers, notably increasing average age of the population, increasing urbanization, and decreasing sense of family responsibility for the elderly.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Henry Garland

There are no affiliations available

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