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The Epidermis

  • Isser Brody
Chapter
Part of the Handbuch Der Haut- und Geschlechtskrankheiten book series (HAUT, volume 1 / 1)

Zusammenfassung

Since the presentation, in the first edition of Jadassohn’s “Handbuch der Haut- und Geschlechtskrankheiten”, of the histology and histochemistry of the normal epidermis (Pinkus, 1927) and of different aspects of the melanin pigment (Bloch, 1927), research activities in these two fields have been much intensified. Our knowledge of both the structure and function of the epidermis has been considerably extended, and this advance has been rendered possible chiefly by the development and application of electron-microscopic, histochemical, autoradiographic, X-ray diffraction and biochemical methods.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isser Brody
    • 1
  1. 1.StockholmSweden

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