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Syntra — An Interactive Program to Design Grashof Planar Four Bar Mechanisms

  • C. R. Barker
Conference paper

Abstract

Linkage synthesis has always been the most challenging task in kinematics. It is therefore natural that a computer can be of great assistance to the mechanism designer in arriving at a successful solution. Beginning around 1970 several synthesis programs appeared which were implemented on mainframe computers. Recently the advent of powerful personal computers has made the cost of the hardware less of a barrier to a large number of small design firms. As a result, several of the larger programs have been rewritten to run on small computers. Krouse [1] describes the evolution of Micro-Kinsyn [2] and Micro-Linkages [3] both of which are currently available for relatively inexpensive computers. These programs are based upon Burmester’s graphical solution for four precision points and use the computer to expedite the complex calculations required.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. R. Barker
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MissouriRollaUSA

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