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Induction Motor: Modeling and Control

  • Farshad Khorrami
  • Prashanth Krishnamurthy
  • Hemant Melkote
Chapter
Part of the Power Systems book series (POWSYS)

Abstract

The physical construction of induction motors is very simple since they do not have brushes, commutator, permanent magnet, or windings on the rotor. The name, induction motor, is due to the fact that the rotor voltage is induced in the rotor windings rather than being supplied by an external voltage source. No DC field current is required to run the machine. Induction motors have either squirrel-cage rotors or wound rotors. A squirrel-cage rotor consists of a series of conducting bars (made of copper or aluminum) short-circuited together at both ends of the rotor. In wound rotors, the rotor windings are brought out to slip rings that can be short-circuited through external, variable resistances.

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References

  1. 1.
    The inductance between windings (stator or rotor), α and ß, is by definition the flux linkage in winding α due to unit current in winding ß, and hence is dependent on the cosine of the angle between the windings.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    For this reason, the position dynamics θ = w are often not explicitly considered in the control design.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ψ q is identically zero.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farshad Khorrami
    • 1
  • Prashanth Krishnamurthy
    • 1
  • Hemant Melkote
    • 1
  1. 1.Control/Robotics Research Laboratory (CRRL) Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringPolytechnic UniversityBrooklynUSA

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