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MICSIM: Concept, Developments, and Applications of a PC Microsimulation Model for Research and Teaching

  • Joachim Merz
Conference paper

Abstract

It is the growing societal interest about the individual and its behaviour in our and ‘modern’ societies which is asking for microanalyses about the individual situation. Economic and social policy analyses about the individual impacts of alternative policy measures, in particular, are an expression of this interest on the individual and of increased use in the political administration, business area, private and university institutes and consulting groups in general.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim Merz
    • 1
  1. 1.Forschungsinstitut Freie BerufeUniversität LüneburgLüneburgGermany

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