Advertisement

Human-Social Robot Interactions: From a Communication and Media Studies Perspective

  • Satomi SugiyamaEmail author
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

As information and communication technologies (ICTs) become smarter and smarter, communication and media scholars started to examine the boundaries between humans and machines, reflecting upon a wide range of focuses such as anthropomorphized machines, humanness and emotions, and attitudes toward robots among others.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literatur

  1. Barile, N. & Sugiyama, S. (2015). The automation of taste: A theoretical exploration of mobile ICTs and social robots in the context of music consumption. International Journal of Social Robotics 407–416.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s12369-015-0283-1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Breazeal, C. L. (2002). Designing Sociable Robots. Cambridge, MA: MIT.Google Scholar
  3. Fortunati, L. (2002). The mobile phone: Towards new categories and social relations. Information, Communication & Society, 5(4), 513–528.Google Scholar
  4. Fortunati, L. (2003). The human body: Natural and artificial technology. In: J. E. Katz (ed.), Machines that become us: The social context of personal communication technology. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 71–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Fortunati, L., Katz, J. E. & Riccini, R. (2003). Mediating the human body: Technology, communication, and fashion. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  6. Fortunati, L. & Vincent, J. (2009). Introduction. In: J. Vincent, & L. Fortunati (eds.), Electronic emotion: The mediation of emotion via information and communication technologies. Oxford: Peter Lang, 1–31.Google Scholar
  7. Fortunati, L. (2013). Afterword: robot conceptualizations between continuity and innovation. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange 1, 116–129. http://www.fus.edu/intervalla/images/pdf/10_fortunati.pdf
  8. Fortunati, L., Esposito, A. & Lugano, G. (2015). Introduction to the Special Issue “Beyond Industrial Robotics: Social Robots Entering Public and Domestic Spheres.” The Information Society 31(1).  https://doi.org/10.1080/01972243.2015.1020195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Fujimoto, K. (2005). The third stage paradigm: Territory machines from the girls’ pager revolution to mobile aesthetics. In: M. Ito, D. Okabe, & M. Matsuda (eds.), Personal, portable, pedestrian: Mobile phones in Japanese life. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 77–101.Google Scholar
  10. Gergen, K. (2002). The challenge of absent presence. In: J. E. Katz, & M. Aakhus (eds.), Perpetual contact: Mobile communication, private talk, public performance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 227- 241.Google Scholar
  11. Goffman, E. (1963). Behavior in Public Places: Notes on the Social Organization of Gatherings. New York: The Free Press.Google Scholar
  12. Höflich, J. R. (2013). Relationship to social robots: Toward a triadic analysis of media -oriented behavior. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange 1, 35–48. https://www.fus.edu/intervalla-files/4_holflich.pdf
  13. Horton, D., & Wohl, R. R. (1956). Mass communication and para-social interaction. Psychiatry, 19, 215–229.Google Scholar
  14. Katz, J. E. & Aakhus, M. (2002). Perpetual contact: Mobile communication, private talk, public performance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Katz, J. E. (2003). Machines that become us: The social context of personal communication technology. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.Google Scholar
  16. Katz, J. E. & Sugiyama, S. (2006). Mobile phones as fashion statements: Evidence from student surveys in the US and Japan. New Media and Society 8(2), 367–383.Google Scholar
  17. Licoppe, C. (2004). ‘Connected’ Presence: The Emergence of a New Repertoire for Managing Social Relationships in a Changing Communication Technoscape. In: Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 22(1), 135–156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ling, R. (2003). Fashion and vulgarity in the adoption of the mobile telephone among teens in Norway. In: L. Fortunati, J. E. Katz, & R. Riccini (eds.), Mediating the human body: Technology, communication, and fashion. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 93–102.Google Scholar
  19. Ling, R. & Yttri, B. (2002). Hyper-coordination via mobile phones in Norway. In: J. E. Katz, & M. Aakhus (Eds.), Perpetual contact: Mobile communication, private talk, public performance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 139- 169.Google Scholar
  20. Linke, C. (2013). Social Robotic Experience and Media Communication Practices: An Exploration on the Emotional and Ritualized Human-technology-relations. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange 1, 49–59. https://www.fus.edu/intervalla-files/5_linke.pdf
  21. Mori, M. (1970/2012). The Uncanny Valley. Energy 7 (4) 33–35 (in Japanese). Retrieved from https://www.getrobo.com
  22. Nishio, S., Ishiguro, H. & Hagita, N. (2007). Geminoid: Teleoperated Android of an Existing Person. In: A. Pina Filho (ed.), Humanoid Robots, New Developments. Vienna, Austria: I-Tech, 343–352.Google Scholar
  23. Oksman, V. & Rautiainen, P. (2003a). “Perhaps it is a body part”: How the mobile phone became an organic part of the everyday lives of Finnish children and teenagers. In: J. E. Katz (Ed.), Machines that become us: The social context of personal communication technology. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 201–217.Google Scholar
  24. Oksman, V. & Rautiainen, P. (2003b). Extension of the hand: Children’s and teenagers’ relationship with the mobile phone in Finland. In: L. Fortunati, J. E. Katz, & R. Riccini (eds.), Mediating the human body: Technology, communication, and fashion. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 103–111.Google Scholar
  25. Palmer, M. (2012). SoftBank puts faith in future of robots http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/c531491e-6b7b-11e1-ac25-00144feab49a.html#axzz416Ezys6E (last accessed on February 24, 2016.).
  26. Reeves, B. & Nass, C. (1996). The Media equation: How people treat computers, television, and new media like real people and places. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Sugiyama, S. (2018). Exploration of expected interaction norms with a social robot in everyday life: A case of twitter analysis in Japan (long abstract). M. Funk et al. (Eds), Envisioning Robots in Society—Politics, Power, and Public Space. IOS Press Ebooks.Google Scholar
  28. Sugiyama, S. (2009). The decorated mobile phone and emotional attachment for Japanese youths. In: J. Vincent, & L. Fortunati (Eds.), Electronic emotion: The mediation of emotion via information and communication technologies. Oxford: Peter Lang, 85–103.Google Scholar
  29. Sugiyama, S. (2010a). Fashion and the mobile phone: A study of symbolic meanings of mobile phone for college-age young people across cultures. In: J. R. Höflich, G. F. Kircher, C. Linke, & I. Schlote (eds.), Mobile media and the change of everyday life. Berlin: Peter Lang, 171–190.Google Scholar
  30. Softbank website (robot). http://www.softbank.jp/robot/ (last accessed on June 20, 2019).
  31. Sugiyama, S. (2013). Melding with the self, melding with relational partners, and turning into a quasi-social robot: A Japanese case study of people’s experiences of emotion and mobile devices. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange 1, 71–84. http://www.fus.edu/intervalla/images/pdf/7_sugiyama.pdf
  32. Sugiyama, S. & Vincent, J. (2013). Social robots and emotion: transcending the boundary between humans and ICTs. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange 1, 1–6. http://www.fus.edu/intervalla/images/pdf/1_sugiyama_vincent.pdf
  33. Turkle, S. (2011). Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  34. Vincent, J. (2009). Emotion, my mobile, my identity. In: J. Vincent, & L. Fortunati (eds.), Electronic emotion: The mediation of emotion via information and communication technologies. Oxford: Peter Lang, 187–206.Google Scholar
  35. Vincent, J. (2013). Is the mobile phone a personalized social robot? intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange 1, 60–70. http://www.fus.edu/intervalla/images/pdf/6_vincent.pdf
  36. Vincent, J., Taipale, S., Sapio, B., Lugano, G. & Fortunati, L. (2015). Social robots from a human perspective. Cham, CH: Springer.Google Scholar
  37. Walther, J. B., & Parks, M. R. (2002). Cues Filtered Out, Cues Filtered in: Computer Mediated Communication and Relationships, In: G. R. Miller (ed.), The Handbook of Interpersonal Communication, Thousand Oaks, Sage, 529–563.Google Scholar
  38. Zhao, S. (2006). Humanoid social robots as a medium of communication. New Media and Society 8(3), 401–419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Communication and Media StudiesFranklin University SwitzerlandSorengo-LuganoSchweiz

Personalised recommendations