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Assisted / autonomous vs. human driving assessment on the DiM driving simulator using objective / subjective characterization

  • A. Affani
  • P. Zontone
  • R. Fenici
  • D. Brisinda
  • D. Bacchin
  • L. Gamberini
  • P. Pluchino
  • M. Bruschetta
  • C. Savorgnan
  • F. Formaggia
  • M. Minen
  • Diego Minen
Conference paper
Part of the Proceedings book series (PROCEE)

Abstract

More and more sophisticated assisted/autonomous vehicles are becoming available in the market. Automation levels 2 and 3 have been given for settled just a couple of years ago, and the path to fully autonomous car seemed to have no obstacles. In reality, OEMs started recently realizing that the impact of semi and/or fully robotized cars on drivers as well as on passengers is all but predictable. VI-grade has more than ten years experience with developing turn-key solution driving simulators, and has been working for more than five years on a research project to collect meaningful bio-signals from the driver during simulator sessions, in collaboration with the BACPIC of the Catholic University of Sacred Heart and the DPIA of the University of Udine. Recently, a collaboration with the Human Inspired Technology Research Center of University of Padova allowed the extension of the assessment at physio-emotional level.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Affani
    • 1
  • P. Zontone
    • 1
  • R. Fenici
    • 2
  • D. Brisinda
    • 2
  • D. Bacchin
    • 3
  • L. Gamberini
    • 3
  • P. Pluchino
    • 3
  • M. Bruschetta
    • 4
  • C. Savorgnan
    • 5
  • F. Formaggia
    • 5
  • M. Minen
    • 5
  • Diego Minen
    • 5
  1. 1.DPIA, University of UdineUdineItaly
  2. 2.BACPIC, UCSC RomaRomaItaly
  3. 3.HIT University PadovaPadovaItaly
  4. 4.DIE University of PadovaPadovaItaly
  5. 5.VI-grade s.r.lTorinoItaly

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