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Experiences and Perceptions of Refugees and Forced Migrants in the EU, Aiming to Cross an Internal Schengen Border

  • Monika WeissensteinerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The person who speaks is Mahmud, a man in his early forties. He is one of 5,756 Somalis who reached Italy in 2014. A year in which 747 persons of Somali nationality presented an asylum application in Italy.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of KentKentEngland

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