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Introduction

  • Vladimir Jovanović
Chapter

Abstract

High energy consumption has been emphasized as a major issue in the energy sector in Southeast Europe by the European Union (EU). Energy consumption, be it for heating, cooling, or other day-to-day activities, is also one of the major household expenses. This affects the budget of the home’s occupants, who would need a sufficient in order to provide comfortable living conditions and well-being. At the same time, this high level of energy consumption, in a very direct way, influences the quantity of greenhouse gases being emitted to the atmosphere.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir Jovanović
    • 1
  1. 1.HeidelbergGermany

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