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Diskriminierung zwischen Gruppen

  • Ulrich WagnerEmail author
Chapter
  • 134 Downloads

Zusammenfassung

Diskriminierung zwischen Gruppen geht auf psychologische und soziale Prozesse zurück. Diskriminierung beeinträchtigt die Diskriminierenden und die Diskriminierten. Möglichkeiten, der Neigung zu Diskriminierung entgegenzuwirken, bieten Informations- und Kontaktkampagnen. Voraussetzung für die Wirksamkeit solcher Kampagnen ist allerdings ein entsprechender gesellschaftlicher Konsens.

Schlüsselwörter

Kategorisierung Diskriminierung Gesundheit Intergruppenkontakt Kontakt 

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fachbereich Psychologie und Zentrum für KonfliktforschungUniversität MarburgMarburgDeutschland

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