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Light and carbon dioxide in stomatal movements

  • O. V. S. Heath
Chapter
Part of the Handbuch der Pflanzenphysiologie / Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology book series (532, volume 17/1)

Abstract

An extensive review of the literature of the physiology of stomata has been provided by Stålfelt (1956) in vol. III of this Encyclopedia. No attempt is made here, therefore, to cover the literature of the present subject completely; only such papers are discussed as seem most important for a critical appraisal of its development and present status but where necessary they are considered in some detail.

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