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Nervensystem pp 209-243 | Cite as

General histopathological aspects of some experimental viral encephalitides

  • Elias E. Manuelidis
Chapter
Part of the Handbuch der Speziellen Pathologischen Anatomie und Histologie book series (SPEZIELLEN, volume 13 / 2)

Abstract

In the field of viral encephalitides experimental research has contributed much valuable information to the further understanding of virological and pathoanatomical problems. This is made possible by the fact that many animal hosts are susceptible to the causative agents of infectious diseases of man. In animals, the experimental infection can be timed to allow study of the disease in all its developmental stages. Human autopsy material rarely, if ever, offers opportunity to determine the structures first altered in the early phase of a viral encephalitis. The absence of marked post-mortem changes in the experimental material makes it superior for the study of fine cellular detail. Further, experimental infection allows correlation of virus activity in the infected animal with disturbances of function and of cellular structure in both early and fully developed disease as well as in the recovered animals. Experimental work in the field of poliomyelitis (4) exemplifies how fruitful such an approach can be.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1958

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elias E. Manuelidis
    • 1
  1. 1.New HavenUSA

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