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Electronic spectra of solvated NH4 radicals NH4(NH3)n for n = 1 – 6

  • S. Nonose
  • T. Taguchi
  • K. Mizuma
  • K. Fuke
Conference paper

Abstract

Electronic absorption spectra of NH4(NH3) n , (n = 1 – 6) were measured in the energy region of 4500–14000 cm−1. The spectra were assigned to the transition derived from a 3p 2F2 − 3s 2A1 Rydberg-Ryclberg transition of NH4. A drastic decrease of excitation energy from the transition of NH4 (15 062 cm−1) down to 5800 cm−1 for NH4(NH3)4 cluster was observed, while there was no clear difference for n = 4, 5, and 6. Successive binding energies of NH4(NH3) n in the 3p-type state determined from the spectra were found to decrease monotonically with increasing n, in a similar manner to those of a positive ion, NH 4 + . The drastic spectral change was ascribed to spontaneous ionization of NH4 in ammonia clusters.

PACS

36.40.-c Atomic and molecular clusters 33.20.Ea Infrared spectra 61.46.+w Clusters, nanoparticles, and nanocrystalline materials 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Nonose
    • 1
  • T. Taguchi
    • 1
  • K. Mizuma
    • 1
  • K. Fuke
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry, Faculty of ScienceKobe UniversityKobeJapan

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