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Assessment of the Dependence Liability of Opiates and Sedative-Hypnotics

  • D. R. Jasinski
Conference paper
Part of the Bayer-Symposium book series (BAYER-SYMP, volume 4)

Abstract

Assessment of analgesics is based upon the demonstration of morphine-like subjective effects and physical dependence as demonstrated in substitution tests or direct addiction tests. Similar relative potencies in comparison to morphine for scales measuring subjective effects, miosis, suppression of abstinence and relief of pathological pain are sufficient evidence for classification as a morphine-like agent. Recently the use of the Morphine-Benzedrine Group (MBG) scale has improved the methods for assessing morphine-like subjective effects. Substitution studies conducted at various levels of morphine dependence have demonstrated the ability to assess for levels of morphine-like intrinsic activity. Assessing sedative-hypnotic agents for physical dependence capacity by substitution or direct addiction tests in man is not practical. It appears that from a comparison of secobarbital and pentobarbital, single doses of sedative-hypnotics can be assayed for their ability to facilitate post-rotatory nystagmus and produce scores on scales which measure barbiturate-like subjective effects.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. R. Jasinski
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Mental HealthAddiction Research CenterLexingtonUSA

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