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The Study of Intercalated Molecules Using One- and Two-Dimensional Solid-State NMR

  • M. J. Duer
  • J. Klinowski
  • J. Rocha
Conference paper

Abstract

The importance of intercalation compounds for catalytic purposes has long been recognised, and as a consequence there have been many studies of them using techniques such as XRD and infra-red vibrational spectroscopy. The aim of the majority of these studies has been to determine the site of the intercalated molecule in the host material, and to determine its structure. Neither XRD nor infra-red spectroscopy give unequivocal answers to these questions. Furthermore, neither technique gives information on the motion of the intercalated molecule inside the host. Both localised and diffusion motions may well be important in determining the catalytic activity of the intercalate. We have used a range of one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to study both the site and structure of the intercalated molecule, and to study its motion. In order to illustrate the power of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in this area, we discuss just one system, that of kaolinite: dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO).

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Duer
    • 1
  • J. Klinowski
    • 1
  • J. Rocha
    • 1
  1. 1.University Chemical LaboratoriesCambridgeGreat Britain

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