Advertisement

NMR Imaging: Current Status and Future Prospects

  • P. Mansfield
  • R. J. Coxon
  • D. N. Guilfoyle
  • A. M. Blamire
  • P. Gibbs
  • P. Harvey
  • M. Symms
Conference paper

Abstract

For magnetic resonance imaging in medicine it is important to be able to image rapidly as well as produce images of high spatial resolution. The speed is important because the body is in general moving. There are roughly three time regimes which are important in determining the imaging speed. The slowest is on a time scale of about 20 seconds and is the time a normal person could reasonably be expected to hold their breath. The second time regime is around 4 or 5 seconds and is the time scale at which peristaltic and intestinal motion occurs. The third and fastest regime is heart motion, and here it is necessary to image at times considerably less than 1 second in order to effectively ‘freeze’ cardiac motion in time.

PACS nos

70.1214 51.1214 

References

  1. 1.
    P.C. Lauterbur, Nature 242, 190, (1973).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Mansfield and P.K. Grannell, J. Phys. C. 6, L422 (1973).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    P. Mansfield, J. Phys. C. 10, L55 (1977).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    P. Mansfield and B. Chapman, J. Phys. E. 19, 540 (1986).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Haase, D. Matthaei and D. Norris, Proc. 8th Ann. Mtg. SMRM Amsterdam 1, 304 (1989).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    P. Mansfield, A.M. Howseman and R.J. Ordidge, J. Phys. E. 22, 324 (1989).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    S. Ljunggren, J. Mag. Res. 54, 338 (1983).ADSGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Mansfield
    • 1
  • R. J. Coxon
    • 1
  • D. N. Guilfoyle
    • 1
  • A. M. Blamire
    • 1
  • P. Gibbs
    • 1
  • P. Harvey
    • 1
  • M. Symms
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK

Personalised recommendations