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Origin and Replication of Defective Interfering Particles

  • Jacques Perrault
Chapter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 93)

Abstract

Defective interfering virus (DI) particles represent a major controlling element of virus replication. They are constantly generated at low levels by infectious virus and only amplify to interfering levels when the parent helper vims is abundant. This autointerference phenomenon, as it was called when first discovered, is achieved by rearrangements and deletions of the standard virus genome such that the resulting “incomplete form” of the virus can preferentially replicate.

Keywords

Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Semliki Forest Virus Sindbis Virus Minus Strand Internal Deletion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacques Perrault
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisUSA

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