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The Sensitivity of CT and rCBF-Studies for the Pathology of Strokes

  • K. Kohlmeyer
Conference paper

Abstract

Stroke is a focal cerebral vascular event. We are faced with the problem of visualising within the brain, in vivo, the pathological focal changes which cause hemiplegia, disorders of language, writing and reading, apraxia, etc. Cerebral angiography is only able to elucidate the pathology of the cerebral vascular system as a precondition of ischemia, infarct or bleeding. A localized pathology of the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and the morphology of the brain tissue can be visualized by the use of new techniques in radiology and nuclear medicine : measurements of rCBF by radioactive diffusible isotopes, of the density of the brain tissue, by CT, and of the cerebral metabolism regionally by positron-emission tomography. Having studied 475 stroke patients par rCBF measurements and 335 by CT we think it useful to compare the value of these two methods in revealing information on the pathology underlying focal disorders of brain functions due to stroke.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Kohlmeyer

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